Diabetes in the News

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Activist, Nutritionist Sees Food as Key to Health and Prosperity

Alice Ammerman, Dr.P.H., R.D., was an activist in nutritional issues long before childhood obesity, diabetes or the sustainable local food movement were headline news. As a student of African studies and anthropology – and basketball player -- at Duke University in the 1970s, she was spurred to action by the boycott of Nestle. The company was marketing infant formula to African mothers who often were left to mix it with contaminated water and in a diluted state because they could not read the directions.


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Building a Better System

When it comes to preventing and treating chronic illness, there are a lot of variables in play. There are, of course, genetics, environment, lifestyle and medications. Then there is the health care system. How patients gain access to and interact with the system of care is the linchpin, according to Michael Pignone, M.D., M.P.H.


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CDTR Fosters Collaboration in Diabetes Research

The newly established UNC Center for Diabetes Translation Research to Reduce Health Disparities (CDTR) recently brought together institutional partners and diabetes researchers to foster collaboration during its first annual meeting. One of seven such centers established nationally, it began in September 2011 with a $3 million, 5-year grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The CDTR’s mission is to facilitate research about diabetes and move discoveries more quickly into practice, treatments and the community.


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Healthy Barbecue?

Barbecue can be good for you. No, that is not a misprint. Just ask Alice Ammerman, Ph.D., and Catherine Rohweder, Dr.P.H., who demonstrated the unlikely benefits of this Southern favorite by cooking healthy BBQ at a booth at the 44th Annual Lumbee Homecoming, July 7, in Pembroke, N.C.


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NIH study finds interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes give good return on investment

Programs to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in high-risk adults would result in fewer people developing diabetes and lower health care costs over time, researchers conclude in a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Prevention programs that apply interventions tested in the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) clinical trial would also improve quality of life for people who would otherwise develop type 2 diabetes. The analysis of costs and outcomes in the DPP and its follow-up study is published in the April 2012 issue of Diabetes Care and online March 22 at http://diabetes.org/diabetescare.


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